Główna English for Everyone - Level 1 Beginner - Course Book

English for Everyone - Level 1 Beginner - Course Book

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Are you a beginner learning English as a second language? Everything you need is included in English for Everyone: Level 1: Beginner, Course Book-it's a grammar book, vocabulary builder, and exercise course all in one. Learn to engage in everyday topics such as your job, home, likes and dislikes, health, and more. This course book also covers how to talk about the present. English for Everyone: Level 1: Beginner, Course Book covers the language skills, vocabulary, and grammar needed for the major global English-language exams, including TOEFL. All learning is practiced across speaking, listening, reading, and writing exercises, offering rounded preparation for work, travel, study, and exams. Download the free app and practice online with free listening exercises at www.dkefe.com.

File: American Edition, partly with OCR

Rok:
2016
Wydawnictwo:
DK, Dorling Kindersley
Język:
english
Strony:
184
ISBN 13:
9781465447623
Plik:
PDF, 76,80 MB
Ściągnij (pdf, 76,80 MB)

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4 comments
 
Odanier Otero Junco
English for everyone is the best collection ever.
22 May 2021 (03:18) 
Mr Fernando
Thank you so much for these books.
23 May 2021 (14:20) 
Salvador
Gracias por los libros y Pdf
21 July 2021 (12:43) 
Elsa
how to download the audio?
08 September 2021 (16:13) 

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1

Working From Home For Dummies

Year:
2020
Language:
english
File:
EPUB, 14.96 MB
0 / 0
Author
Rachel Harding has a background in English-language teaching
and is now a full-time author of English-language learning materials.
She has written for major English-language publishers including
Oxford University Press.

Course consultant
Tim Bowen has taught English and trained teachers in more than 30
countries worldwide. He is the co-author of works on pronunciation
teaching and language-teaching methodology, and author of
numerous books for English-language teachers. He is currently a
freelance materials writer, editor, and translator. He is a member
of the Chartered Institute of Linguists.

Language consultant
Professor Susan Barduhn is an experienced English-language
teacher, teacher trainer, and author, who has contributed to
numerous publications. In addition to directing English-language
courses in at least four different continents, she has been President
of the International Association of Teachers of English as
a Foreign Language, and an adviser to the British Council
and the US State Department. She is currently a Professor
at the School for International Training in Vermont, USA.

ENGLISH
FO R E V E RYO N E
COURSE BOOK
LEVEL
BEGINNER

Contents
US Editors Allison Singer, Jenny Siklos
Editors Gareth Clark, Lisa Gillespie, Andrew Kerr-Jarrett
Art Editors Chrissy Barnard, Ray Bryant
Senior Art Editor Sharon Spencer
Editorial Assistants Jessica Cawthra, Sarah Edwards
Illustrators Edwood Burn, Denise Joos, Michael Parkin,
Jemma Westing
Audio Producer Liz Hammond
Managing Editor Daniel Mills
Managing Art Editor Anna Hall
Project Manager Christine Stroyan
Jacket Designer Natalie Godwin
Jacket Editor Claire Gell
Jacket Design Development Manager Sophia MTT
Producer, Pre-Production Luca Frassinetti
Producer Mary Slater
Publisher Andrew Macintyre
Art Director Karen Self
Publishing Director Jonathan Metcalf
DK India
Jacket Designer Surabhi Wadhwa
Managing Jackets Editor Saloni Singh
Senior DTP Designer Harish Aggarwal
First American Edition, 2016
Published in the United States by DK Publishing
3; 45 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014
Copyright © 2016 Dorling Kindersley Limited
DK, a Division of Penguin Random House LLC
10 9 8 7 6
023–258528–Jun/2016
All rights reserved.
Without limiting the rights under the copyright reserved above, no part
of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a
retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form, or by any means
(electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise), without
the prior written permission of the copyright owner.
Published in Great Britain by Dorling Kindersley Limited.
A catalog record for this book
is available from the Library of Congress.
ISBN 978-1-4654-4762-3
DK books are available at special discounts when purchased
in bulk for sales promotions, premiums, fund-raising, or educational
use. For details, contact: DK Publishing Special Markets, 345 Hudson
Street, New York, New York 10014
SpecialSales@dk.com
Printed and bound in China
All images © Dorling Kindersley Limited
For further information see: www.dkimages.com

A WORLD OF IDEAS:
SEE ALL THERE IS TO KNOW
www.dk.com

How the course works

Introducing yourself

8

12

New language Using “to be” with names
Vocabulary Names and letters
New skill Saying your name

Vocabulary Countries

16

Talking about yourself

18

New language “To be” with ages and nationalities
Vocabulary Numbers and nationalities
New skill Talking about yourself

Vocabulary Family and pets

22

Things you have

24

New language Possessive adjectives; “this” and “that”
Vocabulary Animals and family
New skill Talking about who things belong to

Using apostrophes

28

New language Possessive apostrophe
Vocabulary Family and pets
New skill Talking about belonging

Vocabulary Everyday things

30

Talking about your things

32

New language “These” and “those”
Vocabulary Possessions
New skill Using determiners and pronouns

Vocabulary Jobs

Talking about your job

36

More negatives

38

New language Present simple negative
Vocabulary Daily activities
New skill Saying what you don’t do

Simple questions

42

New language Times of day
Vocabulary Words for time
New skill Saying what the time is

Answering questions

Vocabulary Daily routines

44

Describing your day

46

Asking questions

New language The present simple
Vocabulary Routine activities
New skill Talking about your daily routine

New language Days and prepositions
Vocabulary Days of the week
New skill Talking about your weekly routine

58

62

New language Simple questions
Vocabulary Jobs and routine activities
New skill Asking simple questions

New language Short answers
Vocabulary Jobs and routines
New skill Answering spoken questions

Describing your week

54

New language Negatives with “to be”
Vocabulary “Not”
New skill Saying what things are not

New language Using “I am” for your job
Vocabulary Jobs and workplaces
New skill Describing your job

Telling the time

Negatives with “to be”

66

68

New language Open questions
Vocabulary Question words
New skill Asking for details

50

Vocabulary Around town

74

Talking about your town

76

New language “There is” and “there are”
Vocabulary Towns and buildings
New skill Describing a town

Using “a” and “the”

80

84

88

New language Using “and” and “but”
Vocabulary Town, jobs, and family
New skill Joining sentences

Describing places

92

98

New language “Because”
Vocabulary Places and jobs
New skill Giving reasons

Vocabulary Around the house

106

Vocabulary Food and drink

110

Counting

112

New language Uncountable nouns
Vocabulary Food containers
New skill Talking about food

Measuring

New language Adjectives
Vocabulary Place adjectives and nouns
New skill Describing places

Giving reasons

What do you have?
New language “Have” questions
Vocabulary House and furniture
New skill Asking about household objects

New language Imperatives
Vocabulary Directions
New skill Finding your way

Joining sentences

102

New language Using “have”
Vocabulary Household objects
New skill Talking about possessions

New language Definite and indefinite articles
Vocabulary Places in town
New skill Using articles

Orders and directions

The things I have

New language Measurements
Vocabulary Ingredients and quantities
New skill Talking about amounts

Vocabulary Clothes

118

At the shops

120

New language Using “too” and “fit”
Vocabulary Shopping and clothes
New skill Describing clothes

100

116

Describing things

124

New language Opinion adjectives
Vocabulary Shopping and materials
New skill Giving opinions

Vocabulary Sports

128

Talking about sports

130

New language “Go” and “play”
Vocabulary Sports
New skill Talking about sports

Vocabulary Hobbies and pastimes

Free time

152

What you can and can’t do

154

New language “Can,” “can’t,” and “cannot”
Vocabulary Talents and abilities
New skill Saying what you can and can’t do

Describing actions

158

New language Regular and irregular adverbs
Vocabulary Hobbies and activities
New skill Describing activities

134

Describing ability

136

New language Modifying adverbs
Vocabulary Skills and abilities
New skill Saying how well you do things

New language Adverbs of frequency
Vocabulary Pastimes
New skill Talking about your free time

Likes and dislikes

Vocabulary Abilities

Wishes and desires

140

162

164

New language “Would” and “want”
Vocabulary Leisure activities
New skill Talking about ambitions

New language “Love,” “like,” and “hate”
Vocabulary Food, sports, and pastimes
New skill Talking about what you like

Studying

168

Vocabulary Music

146

New language Adverbs and articles
Vocabulary Academic subjects
New skill Talking about your studies

Expressing preference

148

Answers

172

Index

182

New language Using “favorite”
Vocabulary Food and music
New skill Talking about your favorite things

How the course works
English for Everyone is designed for people who want to teach
themselves the English language. Like all language courses, it
covers the core skills: grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation,
listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Unlike in other courses,
the skills are taught and practiced as
The things I have
visually as possible, using images and
graphics to help you understand and
remember. The best way to learn is to
work through the book in order, making
full use of the audio available on the
website and app. Turn to the practice
book at the end of each unit to reinforce
your learning with additional exercises.
When you talk about things you own, such as furniture or pets,
you can use the verb “have.” You can also use it to talk about
your qualifications and the appliances and rooms in your home.

Mark the sentences that are correct

cross out the incorrect
Word in each sentence

New language Using “have”
Vocabulary Household objects
New skill Talking about possessions

FiLL in the GaPs
usinG “has” or “have”

read the advertiseMents
and answer the questions

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND MARK WHO OWNS WHICH OBJECT

New language Using “have”
Vocabulary Household objects
New skill Talking about possessions

KEY LANGUAGE USING “HAVE”

Use “has” for the third
person singular (he, she, or it).

“Have” is an irregular
verb. The third person
singular form is “has”
not “have.”

HOW TO FORM STATEMENTS USING “HAVE”
SUBJECT

The things I have
When you talk about things you own, such as furniture or pets,
you can use the verb “have.” You can also use it to talk about
your qualifications and the appliances and rooms in your home.

HAVE

OBJECT

These pronouns
take “have.”

88

89

READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS
AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS
088-091_Unit28_Beg_The_things_I_have.indd 88

25/01/16 11:46 pm 088-091_Unit28_Beg_The_things_I_have.indd 89

These pronouns
take “has.”

PRACTICE BOOK
25/01/16 11:46 pm

FILL IN THE GAPS USING “HAVE” OR “HAS”

102

102-105_Unit28_Beg_The_things_I_have.indd 102

Unit number The book is divided
into units. The unit number helps
you keep track of your progress.

Talking about your job
KEY LANGUAGE YOUR JOB

COURSE BOOK

22/01/2016 10:40

Modules Each unit is broken down
into modules, which should be done
in order. You can take a break from
learning after completing any module.

Learning points Every unit
begins with a summary of
the key learning points.

You can use the verb “to be” to describe your job.
The verb “to work” can give more information
about where you work and who you work with.

103

22/01/2016 10:40 102-105_Unit28_Beg_The_things_I_have.indd 103

VOCABULARY WORKPLACES

New language Using “I am” for your job
Vocabulary Jobs and workplaces
New skill Describing your job

FILL IN THE GAPS WITH THE
CORRECT VERB AND ARTICLE

Use “to be” before the job noun.
Use “a” before a noun beginning
with a consonant.

You can use contractions
for these statements.

Language learning
Modules with colored
backgrounds teach new
vocabulary and grammar.
Study these carefully
before moving on to
the exercises.

Use “an” before a noun
beginning with a vowel.

MATCH THE JOBS
TO THE WORKPLACES

KEY LANGUAGE INSIDE / OUTSIDE
Use “inside” for jobs in buildings.

Use “outside” for jobs in the open air.

There is no article
before a plural.

MARK THE CORRECT ANSWERS
CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT WORDS

38

39

038-041_Beg_Unit_10_Talking_about_your_job.indd 38

FREE AUDIO
website and app
www.dkefe.com
8

22/01/2016 10:34 038-041_Beg_Unit_10_Talking_about_your_job.indd 39

Audio support Most modules
have supporting audio
recordings of native English
speakers to help you improve
your speaking and listening skills.

Exercises Modules with
white backgrounds
contain exercises that help
you practice your new
skills to reinforce learning.

22/01/2016 10:34

Language modules
New language points are taught in carefully graded stages, starting with a simple
explanation of when they are used, then offering further examples of common
usage, and a detailed breakdown of how key constructions are formed.

More negatives

Module number Every
module is identified with a
unique number, so you can
Add ‘“do not” or “does not” before most verbs
track your progress and easily
in English to make them negative. This is often
locateto
any
related
audio.
shortened
“don’t”
or “doesn’t.”

Module heading The
teaching topic appears
New language Present simple negative
here, along with
Vocabulary Daily activities
a brief introduction.
New skill Saying what you don’t do

KEY LANGUAGE PRESENT SIMPLE NEGATIVE
Put “do not”
before the verb
to make the
negative for “I,”
“you,” “we,” or
“they.” After “he,”
“she,” or ”it,” use
“does not.”

Sample language New language points
are introduced in context. Colored
highlights make new constructions easy
to spot, and annotations explain them.

The main verb
does not change.

Graphic guide Clear, simple visuals help
to explain the meaning of new language
forms and when to use them, and also
act as an aid to learning and recall.
FURTHER EXAMPLES PRESENT SIMPLE NEGATIVE

Supporting audio This symbol
indicates that the model sentences
featured in the module are available
as audio recordings.

HOW TO FORM PRESENT SIMPLE NEGATIVE
Use “do” or “does” with “not” followed by the base
form of the main verb (the infinitive without “to”).
“DO / DOES” + “NOT”

SUBJECT

BASE FORM

REST OF SENTENCE

Formation guide Visual guides
break down English grammar into its
simplest parts, showing you how to
recreate even complex formations.
58

Vocabulary
AROUND TOWN

058-061_EFE_Unit_16_More_negatives.indd 58

22/01/2016 18:37

Vocabulary Throughout the book,
vocabulary modules list the most
common and useful English words
and phrases, with visual cues to help
you remember them.

Write-on lines You are
encouraged to write your own
translations of English words to
create your own reference pages.
74

074-075_258528_EFE_Unit_20_VOCAB_Around_Town.indd 74

22/01/2016 10:35

9

Practice modules

KEY LANGUAGE “S” AND “ES” ENDINGS

Each exercise is carefully graded to drill
and test the language taught in the
corresponding course book units.
Working through the exercises alongside
the course book will help you remember
what you have Add
learned
and become Add “es” to verbs
“es” to verbs
ending “sh.”
more fluent. Every
exercise is introducedending “ch.”
with a symbol to indicate which skill is
being practiced.

With some verbs you add “es” for he, she, and it. These
include verbs ending “sh,” “ch,” “o,” “ss,” “x,” and “z.”

For most verbs,
just add “s.”

GRAMMAR
Apply new language rules
in different contexts.

VOCABULARY
Cement your understanding
of key vocabulary.

READING
Examine target language
in real-life English contexts.

SPEAKING
Compare your spoken English
to model audio recordings.

LISTENING
Test your understanding
of spoken English.

PRONUNCIATION SAYING “S” AND “ES”
The “-s” endings are pronounced
different ways. Listen to the difference.

Module number Every
module is identified with
a unique number, so you
A “z” sound.
can easily locate answers
and related audio.

An “s” sound.

Say the “es”
like the verb “is.”

KEY LANGUAGE “HAVE GOT” QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
Exercise instruction Every exercise

Questions and answers using “have got” are formed differently.
is introduced
withEnglish.
a brief instruction,
Remember, you mostly
hear this in British

telling
you what you need to do.
“Have” or “has” moves to

FILL IN THE GAPS BY PUTTING THE
VERBS IN THE CORRECT FORM

SAY THE WORDS
OUT LOUD

Use “have” in the
positive answer.

the start of the question.

Sample answer
The first question of
“Got” does
move.
each exercise isnotanswered
for you, to
help make the task easy to understand.
REWRITE EACH “HAVE”
QUESTION
USING
GOT”
Space
for “HAVE
writing
You are encouraged
to write your
answers in the book
for future reference.

Use “have not” or “haven’t”
in the negative answer.

SAY THE ANSWERS OUT
LOUD, FILLING IN THE GAPS

48

Supporting graphics
Visual cues are given
to help you understand
the exercises.

9_EFE_Unit_13_Describing_your_day.indd 48

Supporting audio This symbol
REWRITE EACH SENTENCE IN ITS OTHER FORM
shows that the answers to the22/01/2016
exercise are available as audio
tracks. Listen to them after
completing the exercise.

10:35

Listening exercise This symbol
indicates that you should listen to
an audio track in order to answer
the questions in the exercise.
LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND MARK WHO IS CHECKLIST
GOOD AT OR BAD
AT EACH ACTIVITY
“Have” questions

106-109_Beg_Unit_29_What_do_you_have.indd 109

10

USE THE CHART TO CREATE 12 CORRECT SENTENCES
AND SAY THEM OUT LOUD

House and furniture

Asking about household objects

Speaking exercise
This symbol indicates that
you should say your
answers out loud, then
compare them to model
recordings included in
your audio files.

109

25/01/2016 18:45

Audio
English for Everyone features extensive supporting audio materials.
You are encouraged to use them as much as you can, to improve
your understanding of spoken English, and to make your own
accent and pronunciation more natural. Each file can be played,
paused, and repeated as often as you like, until you are confident
you understand what has been said.
LISTENING EXERCISES
This symbol indicates that you should
listen to an audio track in order to
answer the questions in the exercise.

FREE AUDIO
website and app
www.dkefe.com

SUPPORTING AUDIO
This symbol indicates that extra audio
material is available for you to listen
to after completing the module.

Track your progress

USE THE CHART TO CREATE 12 CORRECT SENTENCES AND SAY THEM
OUT LOUD

The course is designed to make it easy to monitor your progress,
with regular summary and review modules. Answers are provided
for every exercise, so you can see how well you have understood
each teaching point.
USE THE CHART TO CREATE 12 CORRECT SENTENCES AND SAY THEM
OUT LOUD

Exercise numbers
Match these numbers
to the unique identifier
at the top-left corner
of each exercise.

Checklists EveryChoose
unita ends with a Finish with one
determiner.
of these nouns.
or name. can check off
checklist, where you
the new skills you have learned.

Start with
one of these
determiners.

Choose the singular
or plural of “to be”
to match.

CHECKLIST
“These” and “those”
Start with
one of these
determiners.

Choose the singular
or plural of “to be”
to match.

Possessions

Answers Find the
answers to every
exercise printed at
the back of the book.

Using determiners and pronouns
Choose a
determiner.
or name.

Finish with one
of these nouns.

REVIEW THE ENGLISH YOU HAVE LEARNED IN UNITS 01–08

Review
modules At the end SAMPLE
of a SENTENCE
NEW LANGUAGE
group of units, you will find a more
INTRODUCING YOURSELF
CHECKLIST
detailed
review module, summarizing
“These” and “those”
Possessions
HOW
OLD language
ARE YOU?
the
you have
learned. Using determiners and pronouns

Check boxes Use these boxes
UNIT the skills you feel
to mark
comfortable with. Go back and
review anything you feel you
need to practice further.

POSSESSIVE ADJECTIVES

REVIEW THE ENGLISH YOU HAVE LEARNED IN UNITS 01–08
NEW LANGUAGE

APOSTROPHE WITH “S”

SAMPLE SENTENCE

UNIT

INTRODUCING YOURSELF
“THIS,” “THAT,”
“THESE,” AND “THOSE”
HOW OLD ARE YOU?
DETERMINERS AND PRONOUNS
POSSESSIVE ADJECTIVES

35
APOSTROPHE WITH “S”

032-035_Beg_Unit_8_Talking_About_your_things.indd
35
“THIS,” “THAT,”

“THESE,” AND “THOSE”

22/01/2016 10:34

Audio This symbol
indicates that the
answers can also
be listened to.

DETERMINERS AND PRONOUNS

35

032-035_Beg_Unit_8_Talking_About_your_things.indd 35

22/01/2016 10:34

11

Introducing yourself
You can greet people by saying “Hello!” or “Hi!”
Introduce yourself using “I am.” You may also
need to spell out the letters of your name.

New language Using “to be” with names
Vocabulary Names and letters
New skill Saying your name

KEY LANGUAGE SAYING YOUR NAME
There are different
ways of greeting
someone and
introducing yourself.

This is an informal greeting.
It is often used in casual conversation.

This can be a formal
or informal greeting.

You can also
use ”my name is”
plus your name
to introduce yourself.

You can use “I am”
plus your name to
introduce yourself.

OTHER WAYS TO SAY YOUR NAME
In conversational English,
speakers often use
contractions. These are
shortened versions
of pairs of words.

You can contract “I am’” to “I’m.”

You can contract “name is” to “name’s.”

HOW TO FORM SAYING YOUR NAME
SUBJECT

“TO BE”

NAME

Use a capital letter at
the start of a name.

12

REWRITE EACH SENTENCE
IN ITS CONTRACTED FORM

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO, THEN
NUMBER THE PEOPLE IN THE
ORDER IN WHICH THEY SPEAK

USE THE CHART TO CREATE 12 CORRECT SENTENCES
AND SAY THEM OUT LOUD

Start with
a greeting.

Choose a
subject.

Choose a
verb form.

Finish with
a name.

13

KEY LANGUAGE SPELLING YOUR NAME

This is how you ask
someone to spell
their first name.

This is how you ask someone
to spell their last name.

This is your first name
and your last name.

PRONUNCIATION THE ALPHABET
Listen to how the letters of the
alphabet are pronounced in English.

14

You say each letter.

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AS PEOPLE SPELL THEIR NAMES, AND WRITE OUT
EACH SPELLING

SPELL OUT EACH PERSON’S NAME, THEN SAY THE SENTENCES OUT LOUD

CHECKLIST
Using “to be” with names

Names and letters

Saying your name

15

Vocabulary
COUNTRIES

16

NATIONALITIES

17

Talking about yourself
It’s useful to know how to say your age and
where you come from. You can use the verb
“to be” to talk about these topics.

New language “To be” with ages and nationalities
Vocabulary Numbers and nationalities
New skill Talking about yourself

KEY LANGUAGE SAYING YOUR AGE
Use the verb “to be” to
talk about your age.

The verb “to be”
changes with the subject.

FURTHER EXAMPLES SAYING YOUR AGE

HOW TO FORM SAYING YOUR AGE
SUBJECT

“TO BE”

AGE

The number can be
followed by “years old.”

These are pronouns. They are
the subjects of these sentences.

18

The verb changes with the subject.

VOCABULARY NUMBERS

WRITE THE NUMBERS
AS WORDS

FILL IN THE GAPS WITH THE
CORRECT FORMS OF “TO BE”

19

PRONUNCIATION SIMILAR
SOUNDING NUMBERS

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND
MARK THE CORRECT AGES

It is important to stress the correct syllable in these numbers.
Stress the
last syllables.

Stress the
first syllables.

KEY LANGUAGE SAYING WHERE YOU’RE FROM
There are different ways of saying where you are from.
“Where” is the question
word for place.

Remember, “to be”
changes with the subject.

This describes the country
that you belong to.

FURTHER EXAMPLES SAYING WHERE YOU’RE FROM

20

You use an adjective to
talk about nationality.

HOW TO FORM SAYING WHERE YOU’RE FROM
I + “TO BE”

COUNTRY

“FROM”

I + “TO BE”

You use the noun
after ‘“from.”

MATCH EACH FLAG
TO ITS COUNTRY

NATIONALITY

Here you use
the adjective.

WRITE THE NATIONALITY
FOR EACH COUNTRY

USE THE CHART TO CREATE 12 CORRECT SENTENCES
AND SAY THEM OUT LOUD

Start with
a pronoun.

Choose the correct form of
the verb, with or without “from.”

Finish with a noun
or an adjective.

CHECKLIST
“To be” with ages and nationalities

Numbers and nationalities

Talking about yourself

21

Vocabulary
PABLO’S FAMILY

MARY’S FAMILY

22

SARAH’S FAMILY

DAN’S FAMILY

HARRY’S FAMILY

PETS AND DOMESTIC ANIMALS

23

Things you have
Possessive adjectives tell you who something (such as
a pet) belongs to. “This” and “that” are determiners.
They point out a specific object or person.

New language Possessive adjectives; “this” and “that”
Vocabulary Animals and family
New skill Talking about who things belong to

KEY LANGUAGE POSSESSIVE ADJECTIVES
Possessive adjectives are used before the noun. They change
depending on whether the owner is singular, plural, male
or female, the person you are talking to, or yourself.

I own the cat.

The dog belongs to a woman.

We are her parents.

HOW TO FORM POSSESSIVE ADJECTIVES

24

The rabbit belongs to you.

The parrot belongs to a man.

They are his parents.

MATCH THE PICTURES
TO THE PHRASES

FILL IN THE GAPS USING THE
CORRECT POSSESSIVE ADJECTIVES

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, CORRECTING THE ERRORS

25

KEY LANGUAGE “THIS” AND “THAT”
“This” and “that” are called
determiners. They point
out a specific object you
want to talk about. Use
“this” for something close
to you. Use “that” for
something farther away.

The dog is close to you.

The dog is farther away from you.

FURTHER EXAMPLES “THIS” AND “THAT”

FILL IN THE GAPS WITH “THIS” OR “THAT”

26

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, PUTTING THE WORDS IN THE CORRECT ORDER

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO, THEN NUMBER THE IMAGES IN THE ORDER
THEY ARE DESCRIBED

USE THE CHART TO CREATE 12 CORRECT SENTENCES
AND SAY THEM OUT LOUD

Start with a
determiner.

Choose a
possessive adjective.

Finish with
a noun.

CHECKLIST
Possessive adjectives; “this” and “that”

Animals and family

Talking about who things belong to

27

Using apostrophes
In English, you can use apostrophes (’) to show
belonging. You can use them to show who owns
something, such as a pet, and to talk about your family.

KEY LANGUAGE APOSTROPHE WITH “S”
Add an apostrophe and the
letter “s” to the end of a singular
noun to show that what comes
after the noun belongs to it.
This is a common way of
talking about belonging.

New language Possessive apostrophe
Vocabulary Family and pets
New skill Talking about belonging

This form is correct in English,
but it is not normally used.

An apostrophe with an “s” shows ownership.

FURTHER EXAMPLES APOSTROPHE WITH “S”

This can also
be written Tess’.

If something belongs to more than one
noun, only add “-’s” to the last one.

REWRITE THE PHRASES USING AN
APOSTROPHE PLUS “S”

28

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO
AND MATCH THE PAIRS

KEY LANGUAGE APOSTROPHES AND PLURAL NOUNS
To show belonging
with a plural noun, just
add an apostrophe
with no “s.”

Plural nouns use an apostrophe with no “s.”

FURTHER EXAMPLES APOSTROPHES AND PLURAL NOUNS

For plural nouns that don't end
“s,” you should still add “-’s.”

REWRITE PUTTING THE
WORDS IN THE CORRECT ORDER

SAY THE SENTENCES OUT
LOUD, FILLING IN THE GAPS

CHECKLIST
Possessive apostrophe

Family and pets

Talking about belonging

29

Vocabulary
EVERYDAY THINGS

30

31

Talking about your things
You use “these” and “those” when you are referring
to more than one thing. To show who owns a thing,
you can use determiners or possessive pronouns.

New language “These” and “those”
Vocabulary Possessions
New skill Using determiners and pronouns

KEY LANGUAGE USING “THESE” AND “THOSE”
Use “this” for
something near you.

“These” is the
plural of “this.”

Use “these” and “those”
for contrast, too. “These”
things belong to one person.

CROSS OUT THE
INCORRECT WORD
IN EACH SENTENCE

32

Use “that” for
something far from you.

“Those” is the
plural of “that.”

“Those” things
belong to
another person.

WRITE EACH SENTENCE IN ITS
OTHER FORM

VOCABULARY SPELLING
RULES FOR PLURALS

FIND EIGHT PLURALS IN THE GRID
AND WRITE THEM IN GROUPS

For most nouns, to make the plural
you add “s.”

For nouns ending in “x,” “ch,”
and “sh,” you add “es.”

For nouns ending in a consonant followed
by a “y,” drop the “y” and add “ies.”

“S” PLURALS:

“ES” PLURALS:

“IES” PLURALS:

WRITE A PLURAL TO DESCRIBE EACH PICTURE

33

KEY LANGUAGE DETERMINERS AND PRONOUNS
You can use determiners or possessive
pronouns to explain who owns something.

HOW TO FORM
DETERMINERS

PRONOUNS

The determiner comes
before the noun.

The noun comes
before the verb.

The possessive pronoun
is used after the verb.

FILL IN THE GAPS TO WRITE EACH SENTENCE TWO OTHER WAYS

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO, THEN WRITE EACH NOUN IN THE CORRECT GROUP
Tom and Sarah are packing their bags
and getting ready to go to work.
TOM’S BAG

34

SARAH’S BAG

USE THE CHART TO CREATE 12 CORRECT SENTENCES AND SAY THEM
OUT LOUD

Start with
one of these
determiners.

Choose the singular
or plural of “to be”
to match.

Choose a
determiner
or name.

Finish with one
of these nouns.

CHECKLIST
“These” and “those”

Possessions

Using determiners and pronouns

REVIEW THE ENGLISH YOU HAVE LEARNED IN UNITS 01–08
NEW LANGUAGE

SAMPLE SENTENCE

UNIT

INTRODUCING YOURSELF

HOW OLD ARE YOU?

POSSESSIVE ADJECTIVES

APOSTROPHE WITH “S”

“THIS,” “THAT,”
“THESE,” AND “THOSE”

DETERMINERS AND PRONOUNS

35

Vocabulary
JOBS

36

PLURALS
Most nouns about people and
jobs are made plural in the usual
way by adding “-s” or “-es”.

Nouns that end in “man” change
to end in “men” in the plural.

For nouns made up of two words,
the second word is made plural.

37

Talking about your job
You can use the verb “to be” to describe your job.
The verb “to work” can give more information
about where you work and who you work with.

KEY LANGUAGE YOUR JOB

New language Using “I am” for your job
Vocabulary Jobs and workplaces
New skill Describing your job

FILL IN THE GAPS WITH THE
CORRECT VERB AND ARTICLE

Use “to be” before the job noun.
Use “a” before a noun beginning
with a consonant.

You can use contractions
for these statements.
Use “an” before a noun
beginning with a vowel.

There is no article
before a plural.

CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT WORD IN EACH SENTENCE

38

VOCABULARY WORKPLACES

MATCH THE JOBS
TO THE WORKPLACES

KEY LANGUAGE INSIDE / OUTSIDE
Use “inside” for jobs in buildings.

Use “outside” for jobs in the open air.

MARK THE CORRECT ANSWERS

39

KEY LANGUAGE USING “WORK IN” AND “WORK ON”
Use “work in” for the locations of most jobs.

Use “work on” for farms and construction sites.

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND NUMBER THE IMAGES IN THE ORDER
THEY ARE DESCRIBED

WRITE TWO SENTENCES TO DESCRIBE EACH PICTURE

40

KEY LANGUAGE “WORK WITH”
Use “work with” followed by
a noun that relates to your job.

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND
MATCH THE PEOPLE TO THEIR JOBS

VOCABULARY “WORK WITH”

SAY THE SENTENCES OUT LOUD, FILLING IN THE GAPS

CHECKLIST
Using “I am” for your job

Jobs and workplaces

Describing your job

41

Telling the time
There are two ways of saying the time in English. You can
use hours and minutes, or you can say the minutes first
and state their relation to the hour.

New language Times of day
Vocabulary Words for time
New skill Saying what the time is

KEY LANGUAGE TELLING THE TIME
Use the verb “to be”
when giving or asking
the time in English.

US English can use
“quarter after” instead
of “quarter past.”

You can leave out the
“a” before “quarter.”

VOCABULARY TIMES OF DAY

42

MATCH THE CLOCKS TO
THE TIME PHRASES

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND
MARK THE TIMES YOU HEAR

WRITE DOWN THE TIMES,
THEN SAY THEM OUT LOUD

WRITE THE TIMES IN FIGURES

CHECKLIST
Times of day

Words for time

Saying what the time is

43

Vocabulary
DAILY ROUTINES

TIMES OF THE DAY

44

45

Describing your day
Use the present simple tense to talk about the things
you do regularly: for example, when you normally go
to work or eat lunch.

New language The present simple
Vocabulary Routine activities
New skill Talking about your daily routine

KEY LANGUAGE THE PRESENT SIMPLE
To make the present
simple, use the base
form of the verb (the
infinitive without “to”).

The base form of the verb “to eat.”

With he, she, and it, add “s” to the base form.

FURTHER EXAMPLES THE PRESENT SIMPLE

HOW TO FORM THE PRESENT SIMPLE
The base form of the verb.

SUBJECT

VERB

REST OF SENTENCE

With he, she, and it, add “s.”

46

CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT WORD IN EACH SENTENCE

FILL IN THE GAPS USING
THE WORDS IN THE PANEL

SAY THE SENTENCES OUT
LOUD, FILLING IN THE GAPS

47

KEY LANGUAGE “S” AND “ES” ENDINGS
With some verbs you add “es” for he, she, and it. These
include verbs ending “sh,” “ch,” “o,” “ss,” “x,” and “z.”

For most verbs,
just add “s.”

Add “es” to verbs
ending “sh.”

Add “es” to verbs
ending “ch.”

PRONUNCIATION SAYING “S” AND “ES”
The “-s” endings are pronounced
different ways. Listen to the difference.

An “s” sound.

SAY THE WORDS
OUT LOUD

48

A “z” sound.

Say the “es”
like the verb “is.”

FILL IN THE GAPS BY PUTTING THE
VERBS IN THE CORRECT FORM

REWRITE THE SENTENCES,
CORRECTING THE ERRORS

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO
AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS
Joan talks about her daily
routine and work schedule.

USE THE CHART TO CREATE 12 CORRECT SENTENCES
AND SAY THEM OUT LOUD

Start with
a noun
or pronoun.

Finish with a time.
Choose the correct
form of the verb.

CHECKLIST
The present simple

Routine activities

Talking about your daily routine

49

Describing your week
You can talk about your usual weekly activities using the
present simple with time phrases. Time phrases are often
formed using prepositions and days of the week.

New language Days and prepositions
Vocabulary Days of the week
New skill Talking about your weekly routine

VOCABULARY DAYS OF THE WEEK

KEY LANGUAGE PREPOSITIONS AND DAYS OF THE WEEK
You can add “–s” to the day of
the week to show that the thing
happens regularly on that day.

Use “on” before the day
of the week to say the
day you do something.

TIP

Use “from” to say
the day you start
doing something.

Use “to” to say
the day you finish
doing something.

“On the weekend” is more
common in the US.

“At the weekend” is more
common in the UK.

50

In US English, you can
also leave out “go to”
and the preposition
when saying what day
you work: “I work
Mondays.”

FILL IN THE GAPS TO COMPLETE THE SENTENCES

VOCABULARY ACTIVITIES

FILL IN THE GAPS TO COMPLETE
THE SENTENCES

SAY THE SENTENCES OUT
LOUD, FILLING IN THE GAPS

51

VOCABULARY FREQUENCY PHRASES
Use frequency
phrases to say how
often something
normally happens.

HOW TO FORM USING FREQUENCY PHRASES
The frequency phrase
usually goes at the
end of the sentence.

PRESENT SIMPLE

FREQUENCY

FURTHER EXAMPLES FREQUENCY PHRASES

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS

52

PUT THE WORDS IN ORDER
TO FORM A CORRECT SENTENCE

SAY THE SENTENCES OUT
LOUD, FILLING IN THE GAPS

CHECKLIST
Days and prepositions

Days of the week

Talking about your weekly routine

REVIEW THE ENGLISH YOU HAVE LEARNED IN UNITS 10-14
NEW LANGUAGE

SAMPLE SENTENCE

UNIT

TALKING ABOUT JOBS
USING “WORK IN,” “WORK ON,”
AND “WORK WITH”
TELLING THE TIME

THE PRESENT SIMPLE
PREPOSITIONS AND DAYS
OF THE WEEK
FREQUENCY PHRASES

53

Negatives with “to be”
You make a sentence negative by using “not” or its short
form “n’t.” Negative sentences with the verb “to be” have
different rules than negatives with other verbs.

New language Negatives with “to be”
Vocabulary “Not”
New skill Saying what things are not

KEY LANGUAGE NEGATIVES WITH THE VERB “TO BE”
Add “not” after “to be” to
make the sentence negative.

“Not” is added to make the
sentence negative.

FURTHER EXAMPLES NEGATIVES WITH THE VERB “TO BE”

HOW TO FORM NEGATIVES WITH THE VERB “TO BE”
The verb “to be”
takes the same form
in positive and
negative sentences.
The only difference
is adding “not.”

SUBJECT + VERB

“NOT”

REST OF SENTENCE

A plural subject is usually
followed by a plural noun.

54

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, PUTTING THE WORDS IN THE CORRECT ORDER

FILL IN THE GAPS TO MAKE
NEGATIVE SENTENCES

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO, THEN
NUMBER THE IMAGES IN THE
ORDER THEY ARE DESCRIBED

55

KEY LANGUAGE NEGATIVE SHORT FORMS
You can contract
“you are not” in
two ways. You can
contract the
subject and verb,
or you can contract
the verb and “not.”

“You are” contracts
to “you’re.”

“Are not” contracts to “aren’t.”

FURTHER EXAMPLES NEGATIVE SHORT FORMS

You cannot say “I amn’t.”

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, CORRECTING THE ERRORS

56

READ THE BLOG AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS

USE THE CHART TO CREATE 12 CORRECT SENTENCES
AND SAY THEM OUT LOUD

Start with
a pronoun.

Choose a
negative form.

Finish with a
noun or phrase.

CHECKLIST
Negatives with “to be”

“Not”

Saying what things are not

57

More negatives
Add ‘“do not” or “does not” before most verbs
in English to make them negative. This is often
shortened to “don’t” or “doesn’t.”

New language Present simple negative
Vocabulary Daily activities
New skill Saying what you don’t do

KEY LANGUAGE PRESENT SIMPLE NEGATIVE
Put “do not”
before the verb
to make the
negative for “I,”
“you,” “we,” or
“they.” After “he,”
“she,” or ”it,” use
“does not.”

The main verb
does not change.

FURTHER EXAMPLES PRESENT SIMPLE NEGATIVE

HOW TO FORM PRESENT SIMPLE NEGATIVE
Use “do” or “does” with “not” followed by the base
form of the main verb (the infinitive without “to”).
SUBJECT

58

“DO / DOES” + “NOT”

BASE FORM

REST OF SENTENCE

FILL IN THE GAPS USING
“DO NOT” OR “DOES NOT”

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND
ANSWER THE QUESTIONS
Frank talks about his daily
and weekly routines.

KEY LANGUAGE CONTRACTED NEGATIVES
In English, “do not”
and “does not” are
often contracted
to “don’t”
and “doesn’t.”

FURTHER EXAMPLES PRESENT SIMPLE NEGATIVE: SHORT FORMS

59

FILL IN THE GAPS TO WRITE EACH SENTENCE THREE DIFFERENT WAYS

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, CORRECTING THE ERRORS

USE THE CHART TO CREATE 12 CORRECT SENTENCES AND SAY
THEM OUT LOUD

60

READ THE ARTICLE AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS

CHECKLIST
Present simple negative

Daily activities

Saying what you don’t do

61

Simple questions
To form simple questions with the verb “to be,” you
change the order of the subject and verb. The answer
to a simple question usually starts with “yes” or “no.”

New language Simple questions
Vocabulary Jobs and routine activities
New skill Asking simple questions

KEY LANGUAGE QUESTIONS WITH “TO BE”
To make a question
using the verb “to be,”
put the verb before
the subject.

In a question, the verb moves
to the start of the sentence.

In a statement, the subject
comes before the verb.

The subject comes after the verb.

FURTHER EXAMPLES QUESTIONS WITH “TO BE”

HOW TO FORM QUESTIONS WITH “TO BE”
“TO BE”

62

SUBJECT

REST OF SENTENCE

REWRITE THE SENTENCES AS QUESTIONS

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND
CIRCLE THE CORRECT ANSWER
TO EACH QUESTION

INTONATION SIMPLE QUESTIONS
The tone of the voice usually rises at
the end of a simple question in English.
The tone falls at the
end of statements.

The tone goes up at
the end of questions.

SAY THESE SENTENCES OUT
LOUD, FILLING IN THE GAPS

63

KEY LANGUAGE QUESTIONS WITH “DO” AND “DOES”
For questions
without the verb
“to be,” start the
question with
“do” or “does.”
Add “do” to questions
with “I,” “you,” “we,”
and “they.”

Add “does” to
questions with
“he,” “she,” and “it.”

The main verb is
in its base form
(the infinitive without “to”).

FURTHER EXAMPLES QUESTIONS WITH “DO” AND “DOES”

HOW TO FORM QUESTIONS WITH “DO” AND “DOES”
“DO” / “DOES”

SUBJECT

BASE FORM OF VERB

REST OF SENTENCE

FILL IN THE GAPS IN THE QUESTIONS USING “DO” OR “DOES”

64

REWRITE THE QUESTIONS, PUTTING THE WORDS IN THE CORRECT ORDER

REWRITE THE SENTENCES
AS QUESTIONS

SAY THE SENTENCES OUT
LOUD, FILLING IN THE GAPS

CHECKLIST
Simple questions

Jobs and routine activities

Asking simple questions

65

Answering questions
When answering questions in English, you can often
leave out words to shorten your response. These short
answers are often used in spoken English.

New language Short answers
Vocabulary Jobs and routines
New skill Answering spoken questions

KEY LANGUAGE SHORT ANSWERS
When the
question uses the
verb “to be,” use
“to be” in the short
answer. If the
question uses “do”
or “does,” so does
the short answer.

Question uses “to be.”

You don’t need to repeat “a doctor” in your answer.

Question uses “do.”
The rest of the sentence is implied.

FURTHER EXAMPLES SHORT ANSWERS

Question uses “does.”

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS
Maria Kowalski goes
for a job interview.

66

MARK THE CORRECT REPLY
TO EACH QUESTION

ANSWER THE QUESTIONS,
SPEAKING OUT LOUD

CHECKLIST
Short answers

Jobs and routines

Answering spoken questions

67

Asking questions
Use question words such as “what,” “who,” “when,”
and “where” to ask open questions that can’t be
answered with “yes” or “no.”

New language Open questions
Vocabulary Question words
New skill Asking for details

KEY LANGUAGE OPEN QUESTIONS WITH THE VERB “TO BE”
The question word
goes at the beginning
of the question. It is
usually followed by
the verb “to be.”
The question word goes
at the beginning.

The question is “open”
because it can’t be
answered “yes” or “no.”

FURTHER EXAMPLES OPEN QUESTIONS WITH THE VERB “TO BE”

CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT WORDS IN EACH SENTENCE

68

VOCABULARY
QUESTION WORDS

MATCH THE QUESTIONS TO
THE CORRECT ANSWERS

FURTHER EXAMPLES
QUESTION WORDS

FILL IN THE GAPS USING THE
WORDS IN THE PANEL

69

KEY LANGUAGE OPEN QUESTIONS USING “DO” AND “DOES”
With most verbs
other than “to be”
you use the
question word
followed by “do”
or “does” to make
a question.

“Do” or “does” follows the question word.

The question word
goes at the beginning.

Main verb changes
to its base form.

HOW TO FORM OPEN QUESTIONS USING “DO” AND “DOES”
QUESTION WORD

“DO / DOES”

SUBJECT

VERB + OBJECT

FURTHER EXAMPLES OPEN QUESTIONS USING “DO” AND “DOES”

FILL IN THE GAPS TO COMPLETE THE QUESTIONS

70

REWRITE THE SENTENCES,
PUTTING THE WORDS IN THE
CORRECT ORDER

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND
MARK THE QUESTIONS YOU HEAR
Ben talks about his
life as a student.

SAY THE QUESTIONS OUT LOUD, FILLING IN THE GAPS USING THE
WORDS IN THE PANEL

71

READ THE EMAIL AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS

USE THE CHART TO CREATE 12 CORRECT SENTENCES
AND SAY THEM OUT LOUD

Start with a
question word.

72

Choose the correct
form “do” or “does.”

Choose a
pronoun or name.

Finish with the main
verb and object.

REWRITE THE SENTENCES,
CORRECTING THE ERRORS

FILL IN THE GAPS TO
COMPLETE THE QUESTIONS

CHECKLIST
Open questions

Question words

Asking for details

REVIEW THE ENGLISH YOU HAVE LEARNED IN UNITS 15-19
NEW LANGUAGE

SAMPLE SENTENCE

UNIT

NEGATIVES WITH “TO BE”

PRESENT SIMPLE NEGATIVE

SIMPLE QUESTIONS

SHORT ANSWERS

OPEN QUESTIONS WITH “TO BE”
OPEN QUESTIONS USING
“DO” AND “DOES”

73

Vocabulary
AROUND TOWN

74

75

Talking about your town
When you talk about things, you can use “there
is” for one and “there are” for more than one.
“There isn’t” and “there aren’t” are the negatives.

New language “There is” and “there are”
Vocabulary Towns and buildings
New skill Describing a town

KEY LANGUAGE “THERE IS” AND “THERE ARE”
Use “there is” to talk about one thing (singular).

Use “there are” to talk about more than one (plural).

FURTHER EXAMPLES “THERE IS” AND “THERE ARE”

FILL IN THE GAPS USING
“THERE IS” AND “THERE ARE”

76

SAY THESE PLURALS
OUT LOUD

LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND FILL IN THE GAPS TO COMPLETE
THE SENTENCES

KEY LANGUAGE “THERE IS NOT” AND “THERE ARE NOT ANY”
Add “not” to make a
singular sentence negative.

You can shorten
“is not” to “isn’t.”

Add “not any” to make a
plural sentence negative.

You can shorten
“are not” to “aren’t.”

CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT WORD IN EACH SENTENCE

77

ANOTHER WAY TO SAY
“THERE AREN’T ANY”
You can use “are no” instead of
“aren’t any.” It means the same thing.
This is the contracted
form of “are not.”

FURTHER EXAMPLES “ARE NO”

FILL IN THE GAPS
USING “ARE” AND “AREN’T”

78

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO, THEN
NUMBER THE PICTURES IN THE
ORDER THEY ARE DESCRIBED

READ THE EMAIL AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS

LOOK AT THE PICTURE, THEN SAY EACH SENTENCE
OUT LOUD, FILLING IN THE GAPS

CHECKLIST
“There is” and ”there are”

Towns and buildings

Describing a town

79

Using “a” and “the”
Use the definite article (“the”) or indefinite article
(“a,” “an”) to talk about things in specific or general
terms. Use “some” to talk about more than one thing.

New language Definite and indefinite articles
Vocabulary Places in town
New skill Using articles

KEY LANGUAGE “A / AN / THE”
Use “a” because you are talking about your work
in general, not the specific place where you work.

Use “a” to talk
about a thing
in general. Use
“the” to talk about
a place, person,
or thing that you
and the listener
both know about.

Use “the” because you are talking about
the specific building where you work.

FURTHER EXAMPLES “A / AN / THE”
Use “a / an” to talk about jobs.

Use “the” to talk about a particular doctor.

Use “an” before words
that start with a vowel.

Use “a” with “is there”
and “there is.”

Use “the” to talk about a particular bank.

CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT WORDS IN EACH SENTENCE

80

KEY LANGUAGE “A / SOME”
You can only use
“a” and “an” for
singular nouns. Use
“some” for plurals.

Use “a” and “an” to
talk about one thing.

Use “some” to talk about more than one thing.

Singular.

Plural.

FURTHER EXAMPLES “A / SOME”

FILL IN THE GAPS WITH
“A” OR “SOME”

REWRITE THE SENTENCES,
CORRECTING THE ERRORS

81

KEY LANGUAGE QUESTIONS WITH “A / ANY”

Use “a” to find out if there
is one of something.

Use “any” to find out if there
is one or more of something.

FURTHER EXAMPLES QUESTIONS WITH “A / ANY”

CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT WORDS IN EACH QUESTION

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, PUTTING THE WORDS IN THE
CORRECT ORDER

82

KEY LANGUAGE SHORT ANSWERS

Short for: “Yes, there is
a hotel in the town.”

When answering questions in English, you don’t
have to repeat all the words from the question.

Short for: “No, there aren’t any hotels in the town.”

FILL IN THE GAPS WITH
SHORT ANSWERS

LOOK AT THE MAP AND
ANSWER THE QUESTIONS,
SPEAKING OUT LOUD

CHECKLIST
Definite and indefinite articles

Places in town

Using articles

83

Orders and directions
Use imperatives to tell someone to do something.
They are also useful to give a warning, or to give
directions to someone.

New language Imperatives
Vocabulary Directions
New skill Finding your way

KEY LANGUAGE IMPERATIVES
To make the imperative,
use the base form of
the verb (the infinitive
without “to”).
The base form of the
verb “to stop.”

FURTHER EXAMPLES IMPERATIVES

REWRITE THE INFINITIVES AS IMPERATIVES

84

KEY LANGUAGE
GIVING DIRECTIONS

MARK THE DIRECTIONS THAT LEAD YOU TO
THE CORRECT PLACES ON THE MAP

85

VOCABULARY DIRECTIONS

FILL IN THE GAPS USING DIRECTIONS

86

KEY LANGUAGE NEGATIVE IMPERATIVE
Add “don’t” or “do not”
before the verb to make
an imperative negative.

FURTHER EXAMPLES NEGATIVE IMPERATIVE

REWRITE THE SENTENCES
AS NEGATIVE IMPERATIVES

LISTEN AND MATCH THE
DIRECTIONS TO THE PLACES

CHECKLIST
Imperatives

Directions

Finding your way

87

Joining sentences
“And” and “but” are conjunctions: words that join statements
together. “And” adds things to a sentence or links sentences
together. “But” introduces a contrast to a sentence.

New language Using “and” and “but”
Vocabulary Town, jobs, and family
New skill Joining sentences

KEY LANGUAGE USING “AND” TO JOIN SENTENCES
Use “and” to join two
sentences together.

“There’s” is the same as “There is.”

You can drop the second “there’s”
when you join sentences using “and.”

FURTHER EXAMPLES USING “AND” TO JOIN SENTENCES

REWRITE THESE STATEMENTS AS SINGLE SENTENCES USING “AND”

88

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND MATCH THE PLACES MENTIONED
IN EACH “AND” STATEMENT

KEY LANGUAGE USING A COMMA INSTEAD OF “AND”
For lists of more than
two items, you can
use commas instead
of “and.”

You can use a comma
to replace “and” in a list.

Use another comma
before the “and.”

Keep the “and” between
the final two nouns.

MARK THE SENTENCES THAT USE COMMAS AND “AND” CORRECTLY

89

KEY LANGUAGE USING “BUT” TO JOIN SENTENCES
Use “but” to join
a positive and a
negative statement.

You can use “but” to add something
negative to a positive sentence.

You can use “but” to add something
positive to a negative sentence.

MATCH THE BEGINNINGS OF THE SENTENCES TO THE CORRECT ENDINGS

REWRITE EACH PAIR OF STATEMENTS AS A SINGLE SENTENCE

90

CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT WORD IN EACH SENTENCE

LOOK AT THE TABLE, THEN SAY “AND” AND “BUT” SENTENCES OUT LOUD

CHECKLIST
Using “and” and “but”

Town, jobs, and family

Joining sentences

91

Describing places
Use adjectives to give more information
about nouns, for example to describe
a person, building, or place.

New language Adjectives
Vocabulary Place adjectives and nouns
New skill Describing places

KEY LANGUAGE USING ADJECTIVES
Adjectives are usually placed before
the noun they describe.

Adjectives are the same
for male and female nouns.

VOCABULARY ADJECTIVES

92

Adjectives are the same
for singular and plural nouns.

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, PUTTING THE WORDS IN THE CORRECT ORDER

OTHER WAYS TO USE ADJECTIVES
Sometimes, adjectives can be put
in different places in a sentence.

READ THE PASSAGE
AND CIRCLE SEVEN ADJECTIVES

You can put the adjective at the end of
the sentence after the verb “to be.”

The adjective usually
comes before the noun.

You can replace the
noun with a pronoun.

93

FILL IN THE GAPS TO WRITE EACH SENTENCE THREE DIFFERENT WAYS

VOCABULARY PLACES AND SCENERY

94

READ THE POSTCARD AND CORRECT THE INCORRECTLY SPELLED WORDS

SAY THE SENTENCES OUT LOUD, FILLING IN THE GAPS

95

KEY LANGUAGE USING QUANTITY PHRASES
English has many
different phrases
for quantities when
the exact number
is not known.

Use “some” when there is more than one,
but you don’t know exactly how many.

Use “a few” for
a small number.

Use “lots of ” for
a large number.

FURTHER EXAMPLES USING QUANTITY PHRASES

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO, THEN NUMBER THE PICTURES IN THE ORDER
THEY ARE DESCRIBED

96

WRITE SENTENCES ABOUT THE IMAGE USING “A FEW,”
“SOME,” OR “LOTS OF”

LOOK AT THE TABLE, THEN SAY SENTENCES OUT LOUD
USING “A FEW,” “SOME,” AND “LOTS OF”

CHECKLIST
Adjectives

Place adjectives and nouns

Describing places

97

Giving reasons
Use the conjunction “because” to give a reason
for something. You can also use “because”
to answer the question “Why?”

Key language “Because”
Vocabulary Places and jobs
New skill Giving reasons

KEY LANGUAGE USING “BECAUSE”
This is the
main clause.

Use “because” before
you give the reason.

FURTHER EXAMPLES

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS

98

This is
the reason.

FILL IN THE GAPS USING THE PHRASES IN THE PANEL

CHECKLIST
“Because”

Places and jobs

Giving reasons

REVIEW THE ENGLISH YOU HAVE LEARNED IN UNITS 21–26
NEW LANGUAGE

SAMPLE SENTENCE

UNIT

USING “THERE IS” AND “THERE ARE”

ARTICLES

USING “ANY” AND “SOME”

IMPERATIVES

JOINING SENTENCES
USING ADJECTIVES
USING “BECAUSE”

99

Vocabulary
AROUND THE HOUSE

100

101

The things I have
When you talk about things you own, such as furniture or pets,
you can use the verb “have.” You can also use it to talk about
your qualifications and the appliances and rooms in your home.

New language Using “have”
Vocabulary Household objects
New skill Talking about possessions

KEY LANGUAGE USING “HAVE”

Use “has” for the third
person singular (he, she, or it).

“Have” is an irregular
verb. The third person
singular form is “has,”
not “haves.”

HOW TO FORM STATEMENTS USING “HAVE”
SUBJECT

“HAVE”

These pronouns
take “have.”

These pronouns
take “has.”

FILL IN THE GAPS USING “HAVE” OR “HAS”

102

OBJECT

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND MARK WHO OWNS WHICH OBJECT

READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS
AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS

103

KEY LANGUAGE “HAVE” NEGATIVES
Although “have” is irregular, its negative is formed in the usual way.
The negative form can also be contracted as with other verbs.

Use “does not”
instead of “do not”
for she, he, and it.

“Does not” can
be shortened
to “doesn’t.”

“Do not” can be
shortened to “don’t.”

Always use “have”
instead of “has”
in the negative.

WRITE EACH SENTENCE IN ITS OTHER NEGATIVE FORM

USE THE CHART TO CREATE 11 CORRECT SENTENCES
AND SAY THEM OUT LOUD

Start with a
pronoun.

104

Choose the correct
form of the verb.

Choose an article
or determiner.

Finish with
a noun.

ANOTHER WAY TO SAY “HAVE”
Some English speakers,
especially in the UK, use
“have got” instead of “have.”
It means the same thing.
The only difference is the word “got.”

HOW TO FORM ”HAVE GOT”
POSITIVE

Only use this form when using “have” with
“got.” Don’t shorten “I have” to “I’ve a dog.”

NEGATIVE

“Has not got” can be
shortened to “hasn’t got.”

WRITE EACH SENTENCE IN ITS OTHER TWO FORMS

CHECKLIST
Using “have”

Household objects

Talking about possessions

105

What do you have?
Use questions with “have” to ask someone
about the things they own. “Do” or “does”
are used to form the question.

New language “Have” questions
Vocabulary House and furniture
New skill Asking about household objects

KEY LANGUAGE ASKING “HAVE” QUESTIONS
Form “have” questions by adding “do” or “does.”

Add “do” to turn “I,” “you,” “we,”
and “they” statements into questions.

VOCABULARY HOUSEHOLD OBJECTS

106

“Has” changes to ”have” in questions.

Add “does” to form questions
for “he,” “she,” and “it.”

REWRITE THE
SENTENCES AS QUESTIONS

LISTEN AND MARK WHO OWNS
WHICH OBJECTS

USE THE CHART TO CREATE NINE CORRECT SENTENCES AND
SAY THEM OUT LOUD

Start the question
with “do” or “does.”

Choose a
pronoun.

Use “have.”

Finish with
a noun.

107

KEY LANGUAGE SHORT ANSWERS TO “HAVE” QUESTIONS
You can give short
answers to “have”
questions using
“do” and “don’t.”

Add “do” to form
a question.

Use “do” in the
positive answer.

Use “do not” or “don’t”
in the negative answer.

LOOK AT THE PICTURE
AND WRITE SHORT ANSWERS
TO THE QUESTIONS

108

LOOK AT THE PICTURE, THEN
ANSWER THE QUESTIONS OUT LOUD

KEY LANGUAGE “HAVE GOT” QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
Questions and answers using “have got” are formed differently.
Remember, you mostly hear this in British English.

Use “have” in the
positive answer.

“Have” or “has” moves to
the start of the question.

“Got” does
not move.
Use “have not” or “haven’t”
in the negative answer.

REWRITE EACH “HAVE”
QUESTION USING “HAVE GOT”

SAY THE ANSWERS OUT
LOUD, FILLING IN THE GAPS

CHECKLIST
“Have” questions

House and furniture

Asking about household objects

109

Vocabulary
FOOD AND DRINK

110

111

Counting
In English, nouns can be countable or uncountable.
Countable nouns can be individually counted. Objects
that can’t be separated and counted are uncountable.

New language Uncountable nouns
Vocabulary Food containers
New skill Talking about food

KEY LANGUAGE COUNTABLE AND UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS
Use “a,” “an,” or a number to talk about countable nouns.
“Some” can be used for both countable and uncountable nouns.
COUNTABLE NOUNS

UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS
Uncountable nouns are always
paired with verbs in the singular.

Always use “some”
with uncountable nouns,
not “a,” “an,” or a number.
Use “some” when there
are more countable things
than you can easily count.

FURTHER EXAMPLES COUNTABLE AND UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS

CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT WORD IN EACH SENTENCE

112

KEY LANGUAGE NEGATIVES AND QUESTIONS
For both countable and uncountable nouns, use “any” in negative sentences and questions.
COUNTABLE NOUNS

Use “are” for positive
countable statements.

Use “aren’t” for negative
countable statements.

Use “are there” for
countable questions.

UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS

Use “is” for positive
uncountable statements.

Use “isn’t” for negative
uncountable statements.

Use “is there” for
uncountable questions.

FILL IN THE GAPS WITH STATEMENTS AND QUESTIONS

ANSWER THE QUESTIONS BY FILLING IN THE GAPS, SPEAKING OUT LOUD

113

VOCABULARY FOOD CONTAINERS

KEY LANGUAGE MAKING UNCOUNTABLE THINGS COUNTABLE
Uncountable
nouns can be
made countable
if they are placed
in containers.

FILL IN THE GAPS TO COMPLETE THE SENTENCES

114

KEY LANGUAGE QUESTIONS ABOUT QUANTITIES
You use “many” to ask questions about quantities of countable nouns,
and “much” to ask questions about quantities of uncountable nouns.

Use “many” for countable questions.

Use “much” for uncountable questions.

FURTHER EXAMPLES QUESTIONS ABOUT QUANTITIES

FILL IN THE GAPS USING
“HOW MUCH” AND “HOW MANY”

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO
AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS
Listen as Mila and Jon
plan a shopping trip.

CHECKLIST
Uncountable nouns

Food containers

Talking about food

115

Measuring
Use “enough” when you have the correct
number or amount of something. Use “too many”
or “too much” if you have more than enough.

New language Measurements
Vocabulary Ingredients and quantities
New skill Talking about amounts

KEY LANGUAGE “ENOUGH / TOO MANY”
Use “enough,”
“not enough,”
and “too many”
to talk about
quantities of
countable nouns.

Eggs are countable.
You need four eggs. Two is not enough.

Use “enough”
for questions.

Four eggs is the correct amount: enough.

Five eggs is more than enough: too many.

FURTHER EXAMPLES “ENOUGH / TOO MANY”

READ THE RECIPE AND CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT
WORDS IN EACH SENTENCE

116

KEY LANGUAGE “ENOUGH / TOO MUCH”
Use “enough,”
“not enough,” and
“too much” to talk
about quantities of
uncountable nouns.

We need eight ounces of flour. Do we have enough?

4oz
You need eight ounces of
flour. Four is not enough.

8oz

12oz
Twelve ounces is more
than enough: too much.

Eight ounces is the
correct amount: enough.

FURTHER EXAMPLES “ENOUGH / TOO MUCH”

LISTEN AND MATCH THE
PICTURES TO THE AMOUNTS

CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT
WORDS IN EACH SENTENCE

Sheila and Vikram are
preparing to bake a cake.

CHECKLIST
Measurements

Ingredients and quantities

Talking about amounts

117

Vocabulary
CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES

118

CLOTHING SIZES

DESCRIBING CLOTHES

COLORS (US) / COLOURS (UK)

119

At the shops
You can use many different verbs to talk about what
happens when you are shopping. Use “too” and
“enough” to describe how well clothes fit you.

New language Using “too” and “fit”
Vocabulary Shopping and clothes
New skill Describing clothes

VOCABULARY SHOPPING VERBS

CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT WORD IN EACH SENTENCE

120

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, PUTTING THE WORDS IN THE CORRECT ORDER

READ THE MESSAGES
AND CIRCLE 12 ADJECTIVES

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO
AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS
Five groups of friends are talking
about the things they want to buy.

121

KEY LANGUAGE ANSWERING “DOES IT FIT?”
In English, you use “enough” and “too” with adjectives
to describe how well a piece of clothing fits you.
The noun comes first when
asking if something is the correct size.

MATCH THE PHRASES
THAT MEAN THE SAME

122

FILL IN THE GAPS USING
THE PHRASES IN THE PANEL

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND MARK WHICH PIECE OF CLOTHING
EACH PERSON DESCRIBES

USE THE CHART TO CREATE 12 CORRECT SENTENCES AND SAY THEM
OUT LOUD

Start with a
determiner.

Choose an
adjective.

Choose
a noun.

Choose the
correct verb form.

Finish with
a size adjective.

CHECKLIST
Using “too” and “fit”

Shopping and clothes

Describing clothes

123

Describing things
You can use adjectives to give your opinion
about things as well as to give factual information.
You can use more than one adjective before a noun.

New language Opinion adjectives
Vocabulary Shopping and materials
New skill Giving opinions

KEY LANGUAGE OPINION ADJECTIVES
Some adjectives give opinions, not facts.

These are
negative adjectives.

These are
positive adjectives.

KEY LANGUAGE ADJECTIVE ORDER
Adjectives usually follow a set order in English.
Opinion adjectives come before fact adjectives.
OPINION ADJECTIVE

Opinion adjectives come first.

FURTHER EXAMPLES ADJECTIVE ORDER

124

FACT ADJECTIVE

NOUN

Fact adjectives come last.

CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT ADJECTIVE IN EACH SENTENCE

REWRITE THE SENTENCES,
PUTTING THE WORDS IN THE
CORRECT ORDER

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND
MARK THE CORRECT ANSWERS

125

VOCABULARY MATERIALS
Some words can be used both as nouns to name materials, and as adjectives
to say what things are made of. Two of the nouns below change when they
become adjectives: “wood” to “wooden”, and “wool” to “woolen”.

MATCH THE PICTURES TO THE CORRECT DESCRIPTIONS

126

SAY THE SENTENCES OUT LOUD, CORRECTING THE WORD ORDER

CHECKLIST
Opinion adjectives

Shopping and materials

Giving opinions

REVIEW THE ENGLISH YOU HAVE LEARNED IN UNITS 28–35
NEW LANGUAGE

SAMPLE SENTENCE

UNIT

USING “HAVE”

ASKING “HAVE” QUESTIONS
COUNTABLE AND
UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS
USING “ENOUGH” AND “MANY”

SHOPPING VERBS

ADJECTIVE ORDER

127

Vocabulary
SPORTS

128

EQUIPMENT

VENUES

129

Talking about sports
To describe taking part in some sports, you use
the verb “go” plus the gerund. For other sports,
you use “play” plus the noun.

New language “Go” and “play”
Vocabulary Sports
New skill Talking about sports

KEY LANGUAGE “GO” WITH A GERUND
You can make some
verbs into nouns by
adding “-ing” to their
base forms. These
are called gerunds.

“Go” changes
with the subject.

Add “-ing” to the base
form of the verb.

FURTHER EXAMPLES “GO” WITH A GERUND

FILL IN THE GAPS TO COMPLETE THE SENTENCES

130

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND MATCH THE DAYS TO SAM’S SPORTS

KEY LANGUAGE SPELLING GERUNDS
All gerunds end
in “-ing” and
are formed
following these
simple rules.
For most
verbs add “-ing.”

For verbs that end
in “e” delete the “e.”

Then add “-ing.”

For single syllable verbs
ending in a consonant +
vowel + consonant…

…double the final
consonant and add “-ing.”

FIND NINE HIDDEN WORDS AND WRITE THEM IN THE CORRECT GROUP

REGULAR
GERUNDS:

GERUNDS WITH
DOUBLE CONSONANTS:

GERUNDS WITH
DROPPED “E”:

131

KEY LANGUAGE “PLAY” WITH A NOUN
For some sports, especially ball games and
competitions, you use “play” with the noun.
“Play” changes, depending
on the subject.

The noun is placed
after the verb.

FURTHER EXAMPLES “PLAY” WITH A NOUN

CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT
WORD IN EACH SENTENCE

132

REWRITE THE SENTENCES,
CORRECTING THE ERRORS

READ THE ARTICLE AND
ANSWER THE QUESTIONS

SAY THE SENTENCES OUT LOUD, USING “GO” OR “PLAY” AND THE
CORRECT FORMS OF THE VERBS IN BRACKETS

CHECKLIST
“Go” and “play”

Sports

Talking about sports

133

Vocabulary
HOBBIES AND PASTIMES

134

135

Free time
Adverbs of frequency show how often you do
something, from something you do very frequently
(“always”) to something you don’t do at all (“never”).

New language Adverbs of frequency
Vocabulary Pastimes
New skill Talking about your free time

VOCABULARY ADVERBS OF FREQUENCY
Use adverbs of
frequency to say
how often you do
something. You
normally put the
adverb between the
subject and the verb.

100%

0%

KEY LANGUAGE ADVERBS OF FREQUENCY
Time phrases
often go at
the ends of
sentences
using adverbs
of frequency.

SUBJECT

ADVERB OF FREQUENCY

ACTIVITY

TIME PHRASE

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, PUTTING THE WORDS IN THE CORRECT ORDER

136

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND MATCH THE PASTIME TO ITS FREQUENCY
Ben is taking part in a survey about how he
spends his free time. Listen to his answers.

LOOK AT THE TABLE AND SAY THE SENTENCES OUT LOUD, FILLING IN
THE GAPS

137

HOW TO FORM QUESTIONS ABOUT FREE TIME
Use different phrases to ask about the frequency with which someone
does an activity and the specific time that they do something.
Use “how often” to ask about frequency.

Use “when” to ask
about the day or time.

FURTHER EXAMPLES QUESTIONS ABOUT FREE TIME

MARK THE CORRECT QUESTION FOR EACH ANSWER

138

WRITE A QUESTION BASED ON EACH STATEMENT USING
“HOW OFTEN” OR “WHEN”

SAY QUESTIONS OUT LOUD BASED ON THE STATEMENTS

CHECKLIST
Adverbs of frequency

Pastimes

Talking about your free time

139

Likes and dislikes
Verbs such as “love,” “like,” and “hate” express
your feelings about things. You can use
these verbs with nouns or gerunds.

New language “Love,” “like,” and “hate”
Vocabulary Food, sports, and pastimes
New skill Talking about what you like

KEY LANGUAGE LIKES AND DISLIKES WITH NOUNS
You can use these verbs to talk about nouns.
Use “do not” or “don’t” and “does not”
or “doesn’t” to make negative statements.

This means you really like it.

This is stronger
than “don’t like.”

FURTHER EXAMPLES LIKES AND DISLIKES WITH NOUNS

MATCH THE PICTURES TO THE CORRECT SENTENCES

140

TIP

“Don’t like” means
“dislike,” but people
use “don’t like” more
often in spoken
English.

WRITE THE NEGATIVE OF EACH SENTENCE USING “DOESN’T” OR “DON’T”

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND MARK THE CORRECT ANSWERS
Anna talks on Radio
Chat about what she
likes and dislikes.

USE THE CHART TO CREATE NINE CORRECT SENTENCES
AND SAY THEM OUT LOUD

Start with a
pronoun or name.

Choose
a verb

Finish with
a noun.

141

KEY LANGUAGE LIKES AND DISLIKES WITH GERUNDS
You can use verbs such as “like” and “hate”
with gerunds to talk about activities.

FURTHER EXAMPLES LIKES AND DISLIKES WITH GERUNDS

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND MATCH THE LIKES AND DISLIKES
WITH THE CORRECT ACTIVITIES

142

READ THE ARTICLE AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS

143

VOCABULARY REASONS FOR LIKES AND DISLIKES
You can use these
adjectives to talk
about why you
like something.

KEY LANGUAGE “DO” QUESTIONS ABOUT LIKES AND DISLIKES
Use “do” or “does”
to ask if someone
likes something.

Use “do” to ask a question.

You can use “it” to avoid
repeating the subject.

KEY LANGUAGE “WHY” QUESTIONS ABOUT LIKES AND DISLIKES
You can use “why” to
find out the reasons
why someone likes
or dislikes something.

144

Use “why” to ask the reason.
You can use “because”
to link the two parts
of your answer.

WRITE QUESTIONS BASED ON THE STATEMENTS

ANSWER THE QUESTIONS OUT LOUD, USING THE WORDS IN THE PANEL

CHECKLIST
“Love,” “like,” and “hate”

Food, sports, and pastimes

Talking about what you like

145

Vocabulary
MUSIC

146

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

147

Expressing preference
You use “like” and “love” to show how much you
enjoy something. “Favorite” is used to identify
the thing you love most in a group.

New language Using “favorite”
Vocabulary Food and music
New skill Talking about your favorite things

KEY LANGUAGE USING “FAVORITE”
“Like” and “love” are verbs,
so they need subjects
and objects. “Favorite”
is an adjective, so it is
always paired with a
noun or gerund.
This shows you like
this thing the most.

Remember, this verb
is stronger than “like.”

“Favorite” can be followed by a noun
or the phrase “type of ” and a noun.

FURTHER EXAMPLES USING “FAVORITE”

“Italian” is not a particular
food, but a “type of ” food.

The UK spelling is "favourite".

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS

148

MARK THE PICTURE THAT MATCHES EACH STATEMENT

FILL IN THE GAPS USING THE WORDS IN THE PANEL

149

LOOK AT THESE ONLINE PROFILES, THEN FILL IN THE GAPS AND
SAY THE SENTENCES OUT LOUD

150

READ THE ARTICLE AND
ANSWER THE QUESTIONS

CHECKLIST
Using “favorite”

Food and music

Talking about your favorite things

REVIEW THE ENGLISH YOU HAVE LEARNED IN UNITS 37–42
NEW LANGUAGE

SAMPLE SENTENCE

UNIT

“GO” WITH GERUNDS,
“PLAY” WITH NOUNS
ADVERBS OF FREQUENCY

QUESTIONS ABOUT FREE TIME

LIKES AND DISLIKES

QUESTIONS ABOUT LIKES AND DISLIKES

USING “FAVORITE”

151

Vocabulary
ABILITIES

152

153

What you can and can’t do
Use “can” to talk about the things you are able to do,
such as ride a bicycle or play the guitar. Use “cannot”
or “can’t” for things you are not able to do.

New language “Can,” “can’t,” and “cannot”
Vocabulary Talents and abilities
New skill Saying what you can and can’t do

KEY LANGUAGE “CAN / CANNOT / CAN’T”
“Can” goes between the
subject and the verb. The
verb after “can” changes
to its base form (the
infinitive without “to”).

TIP

The long negative
form “cannot” is
always spelled as
one word, not
two words.

Base form of verb.

“Can” is always the same.
It doesn’t change with the subject.

Short form of “cannot.”

FURTHER EXAMPLES “CAN / CANNOT / CAN’T”

HOW TO FORM “CAN / CANNOT / CAN’T”
SUBJECT

154

“CAN / CANNOT / CAN’T”

BASE FORM

OBJECT

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, PUTTING THE WORDS IN THE CORRECT ORDER

CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT WORD IN EACH SENTENCE

FILL IN THE GAPS TO WRITE EACH SENTENCE THREE DIFFERENT WAYS

155

KEY LANGUAGE QUESTIONS AND SHORT ANSWERS
To make a question
using “can,” put “can”
before the subject.
When you answer
“can” questions,
you don’t need to
repeat all the words
from the question.

FURTHER EXAMPLES QUESTIONS AND SHORT ANSWERS

SAY THE SENTENCES OUT LOUD, FILLING IN THE GAPS

156

WRITE QUESTIONS
TO MATCH THE STATEMENTS

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO
AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS
Sheila and Mark talk about the
things they can and can’t cook.

FILL IN THE GAPS WITH “CAN” OR “CANNOT”

CHECKLIST
“Can,” “can’t,” and “cannot”

Talents and abilities

Saying what you can and can’t do

157

Describing actions
Words such as “quietly” and “loudly” are called adverbs.
They give more information about verbs, so you can use
them to describe how you do something.

New language Regular and irregular adverbs
Vocabulary Hobbies and activities
New skill Describing activities

KEY LANGUAGE USING ADVERBS
Adverbs often
come after the
verb they describe.

“Quietly” describes how I speak.

“Loudly” describes how he speaks.

FURTHER EXAMPLES USING ADVERBS

FILL IN THE GAPS USING THE WORDS IN THE PANEL

158

KEY LANGUAGE REGULAR AND IRREGULAR ADVERBS
REGULAR ADVERBS

To make most adverbs, just
add “-ly” to the adjective.
If the adjective ends in “y,”
leave out the “y” and add
“-ily” to make the adverb.

Drop the “y”
and add “-ily.”

IRREGULAR ADVERBS
The adverb is
totally different
to the adjective.

Some adverbs are totally
different to the adjective.
Others are the same. These
are called irregular adverbs.

FIND 8 ADVERBS AND WRITE
THEM IN THE CORRECT COLUMN

REGULAR

The adverb
is the same as
the adjective.

Adjectives
ending “-ly”
don’t change
to become
adverbs.

REWRITE THE SENTENCES,
CORRECTING THE ERRORS

IRREGULAR

159

ANOTHER WAY TO SAY I DO SOMETHING WELL
If you’re “good at” doing
something, you do it well.
Use a gerund or nouns
after the phrase to say
what you’re “good at.”
You can use the gerund after “good at.”

HOW TO FORM “GOOD AT / BAD AT”
The negative
form of “good
at” is “bad at.”

SUBJECT + VERB

“GOOD AT / BAD AT”

GERUND / NOUN

FURTHER EXAMPLES “GOOD AT / BAD AT”

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, PUTTING THE WORDS IN
THE CORRECT ORDER

160

REWRITE EACH SENTENCE IN ITS OTHER FORM

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND MARK WHO IS GOOD AT OR BAD
AT EACH ACTIVITY

USE THE CHART TO CREATE 12 CORRECT SENTENCES
AND SAY THEM OUT LOUD

CHECKLIST
Regular and irregular adverbs

Hobbies and activities

Describing activities

161

Describing ability
Words such as “quite” and “very” are modifying adverbs.
You can use them before other adverbs to give more
information about how you do something.

KEY LANGUAGE MODIFYING ADVERBS
If you do something
“quite” well, you’re
OK but not excellent
at it. If you do it
“very” or “really” well,
you’re excellent.

“Quite” modifies the main adverb,
“well,” and goes before it.

New language Modifying adverbs
Vocabulary Skills and abilities
New skill Saying how well you do things

TIP

In US English,
“quite” is used to
add emphasis
to an adverb.

FURTHER EXAMPLES MODIFYING ADVERBS

MATCH THE BEGINNING OF THE SENTENCES TO THE CORRECT ENDINGS

162

KEY LANGUAGE MODIFYING ADVERBS WITH “GOOD AT”
You can also use
modifying adverbs
with the phrases
“good at” and
“bad at.”
“Quite” modifies “good at.”

Remember that “good
at” and “bad at” are
followed by a gerund.

“Very / really” goes before “good at.”

READ THE REPORT AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS

CHECKLIST
Modifying adverbs

Skills and abilities

Saying how well you do things

163

Wishes and desires
You can use “I want” and “I would like” to talk about
things you want to do. You can also use their negative
form to say what you would not like to do.

New language “Would” and “want”
Vocabulary Leisure activities
New skill Talking about ambitions

KEY LANGUAGE “I WOULD LIKE / I WANT”
“I would like” is
similar to “I want,” but
“I want” is stronger.

He has a strong desire to do a thing.

The contracted form of “I would.”

HOW TO FORM “I WOULD LIKE / I’D LIKE”
“Would” is a modal
verb, so its form
doesn’t change.

SUBJECT

MODAL VERB

FURTHER EXAMPLES “I’D LIKE / I WANT”

164

VERB

INFINITIVE + OBJECT

FILL IN THE GAPS TO WRITE EACH SENTENCE THREE DIFFERENT WAYS

MATCH THE PICTURES TO THE DESCRIPTIONS

USE THE CHART TO CREATE 12 CORRECT SENTENCES
AND SAY THEM OUT LOUD

165

KEY LANGUAGE “I WOULD LIKE / I WANT” NEGATIVES
Use “not” after
“would” to make
the negative.
“Don’t” and
“doesn’t” go
before “want.”

The contracted form of “would not.”

“Don’t” goes before “want.”

FURTHER EXAMPLES “I WOULD LIKE / I WANT” NEGATIVES

FILL IN THE GAPS TO WRITE EACH SENTENCE THREE DIFFERENT WAYS

166

KEY LANGUAGE QUESTIONS AND SHORT ANSWERS
“Would” goes before the subject in a question.

“Does” goes before the subject in
questions with “want.”

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, CORRECTING THE ERRORS

CHECKLIST
“Would” and “want”

Leisure activities

Talking about ambitions

167

Studying
When talking about your studies you can use “I would”
and “I want” to say which subjects you would like to learn.
Use adverbs to say how much you want to do them.

New language Adverbs and articles
Vocabulary Academic subjects
New skill Talking about your studies

VOCABULARY ACADEMIC SUBJECTS

KEY LANGUAGE “REALLY / QUITE”
The adverb “really”
means you want to
do something a lot.
“Quite” is less strong.

You have a strong desire to do it.

Your desire is not as strong.

FURTHER EXAMPLES “REALLY / QUITE”

168

VOCABULARY STUDYING

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, PUTTING THE WORDS IN THE
CORRECT ORDER

USE THE CHART TO CREATE 12 CORRECT SENTENCES
AND SAY THEM OUT LOUD

169

KEY LANGUAGE THE ZERO ARTICLE
You don’t use an
article (“a” or “the”)
with some places
and institutions
when you are
talking about what
they are used for.

She goes there to study, which is the
purpose of schools, so don’t use the article.

Use the article to talk about the
specific building where he works.

FURTHER EXAMPLES THE ZERO ARTICLE
ZERO ARTICLE

ARTICLE

CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT WORDS IN EACH SENTENCE

170

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND MATCH THE PICTURES TO THE NAMES
Maureen talks about what her family
are doing and where they are.

CHECKLIST
Adverbs and articles

Academic subjects

Talking about your studies

REVIEW THE ENGLISH YOU HAVE LEARNED IN UNITS 44-48
NEW LANGUAGE

SAMPLE SENTENCE

UNIT

“CAN,” “CANNOT,” AND “CAN’T”

USING ADVERBS

“GOOD AT” AND “BAD AT”

MODIFYING ADVERBS

“I WOULD LIKE” AND “I WANT”

“REALLY” AND “QUITE”

THE ZERO ARTICLE

171

Answers

172

TOM'S BAG:
sandwiches, cell phone, ID card,
chocolate bar.
SARAH’S BAG:
purse, books, brush, notebook.

“s” PLURALS:
1. apples 2. bottles 3. necklaces
“es” PLURALS:
4. sandwiches 5. brushes 6. watches
“ies” PLURALS:
7. dictionaries 8. diaries

173

174

175

176

177

178

REGULAR GERUNDS:
sailing, snowboarding, skateboarding
GERUNDS WITH DOUBLE CONSONANTS:
swimming, running, shopping
GERUNDS WITH A DROPPED “E”:
skating, horse riding, cycling

179

180

REGULAR
loudly, quickly, badly, easily
IRREGULAR
fast, well, hard, early

181

Index
All entries are indexed by unit number.
Main entries are highlighted in bold.

A

“a” and “an” 10.1 22 31.1
zero article 48
abilities 43 44 46
academic studies 48
accessories (clothing) 33
activities 14.4 45 47 see also daily routines;
pastimes; sports
adjectives 3.9 25
adjective order 35
likes and dislikes 40.11
opinions 35
possessive adjectives 5
using “favorite” 42.1
adverbs 39 48
modifying 46
regular and irregular 45
age 3
alphabet, pronunciation of 1.8
“always” 39.1 39.2
“am” see I am
ambitions 47
“and” 24
animals (pets) 4.6 5 6
answering questions 18
short answers 18.1 22.12 29.6 29.9 44.7
47.10
“any” 22.8 31.4
apostrophes 6
“are” 21.8 31.4
“are not” and “aren’t” 15.7 21.8
articles 10.1 22
zero article 48
asking questions 17 19 39.6
“can” questions 44.7
“do” and “does” questions 40.12 47.10
“have” questions 29.1 29.9
“how many” and “how much” questions 31.10
32.1
intonation 17.6
“is there” and “are there” questions 31.4
“why” questions 40.13
“would” questions 47.10
“at” 14.2

B

“bad at” 45.8 46.4
base form see verbs
“because” 26 40.13
buildings 20 21 see also house town
“but” 24.7

182

C

“can” “cannot” and “can’t” 44
clothes 33 34
colors 33.4
comma use 24.5
conjunctions 24 26
containers (food) 31.7
contracted negatives
aren’t (are not) 15.7
can’t (cannot) 44
don’t (do not) and doesn’t (does not) 16.6
23.8 28.6 47.7
isn’t (is not) and aren’t (are not) 21.6 21.8
wouldn’t (would not) 47.7
contractions
I’d (I would) 47.1
I’m (I am) 1.2 10.1
countable nouns 31 32
counting 31 see also measuring
countries 2 3.9 3.11

D

daily routines 12 13 14 see also jobs
day
days of the week 14.1 14.2
times of the day 11.2 12.2
definite article 22 see also indefinite article; zero
article
“the” 22.1 48.7
desires and wishes 47 48.2
determiners 5.6 8.7
directions 23
dislikes and likes 40
“do” and “does” 17.8 17.10 18.1 19.8 29 40
47
“do not” and “don’t” 16 23.8 28.6 29.6 40
47.7
“does not” and “doesn’t” 16 28.6
drink 30 31

E

“enough” 32 34.6
equipment (sports) 36.2
“es” endings 8.4 9.2 13.7 13.8
everyday things 7 see also possessions

F

fact adjectives 35
family 4 5 6 24
“favorite” 42
feelings (likes and dislikes) 40 42
female and male nouns 5.1 25.1
“few” 25.10
finding your way 23

first names 1.7
fit (clothing) 34.6
food 30 31 40 42
formal English 1.1
free time 39
frequency phrases 14.7 14.8
adverbs 39
“how often” 39.6
“from” 14.2
furniture 27 28 29

G

gerunds 37 40.7 42.1 45.7
giving directions 23.4
“good at” 45.7 45.8 46.4
greetings 1.1

H

habits 12 13 14
“hate” 40
“have” and “has” 28 29
“have got” 28.9 29.9
“hello” and “hi” 1.1
hobbies 38 45 see also pastimes
“how” 19
hours 11
house 27 28 29
household objects 29.2
“how often” 39.6

I

“I am” and “I’m 1 3 10.1
“I am not” and “I’m not” 15
“I would” and “I’d” 47
“I would not” and “I wouldn’t” 47.7
“ies” endings 8.4
“ily” endings 45.4
imperatives 23
“in” 10.8
indefinite article 22 see also definite article; zero
article
“a” and “an” 10.1 22 31.1
infinitive (verbs) 13.1 see also verbs, base form
informal English 1.1 see also contractions;
contracted negatives
“ing” endings 37 see also gerunds
ingredients 32
“inside” 10.6
instruments (musical) 41.2
intonation 17.6
introducing yourself 1 3
irregular adverbs 45.4
irregular verbs 28

JKL

jobs 9 10 16 17 18 22 26
joining sentences (conjunctions) 24 26
last names 1.7
“left” 23.4
“like” 42
likes and dislikes 40
lists (comma use) 24.5
“lots” 25.10
“loudly” 45.1
“love” 40 42
“ly” endings 45.4

M

male and female nouns 5.1 25.1
“many” 31.10 32
materials 35.7
meals 30
measuring 32
see also counting
minutes 11
modal verbs 47.2
modifying adverbs 46
“much” 31.10 32
music 41 42

N

names 1
nationalities 2.2 3.9 3.11
negative contractions
aren’t (are not) 15.7
can’t (cannot) 44
don’t (do not) and doesn’t (does not) 16.6
23.8 28.6 47.7
isn’t (is not) and aren’t (are not) 21.6 21.8
wouldn’t (would not) 47.7
negatives 15 16 44 47.7
see also “bad at”
adjectives 35.1
answers 29.6 29.9 34.6
dislikes 40
imperatives 23.8
statements 21.6 24.7 28.6 28.9
see also “no” answers
with countable and uncountable nouns 31.4
“never” 39
night 11.2 12.2 see also day
“no” answers 17
intonation 17.6
short answers 18.1 22.12 29.6 29.9 40.12
44.7 47.10
“not” 15 21.6 23.8 28 40 47 see also negatives
“not enough” 32
nouns 6.1 6.5 25.1 35.7 42.1
countable and uncountable 31
gerunds 37 40.7 42.1 45.7
plurals 6.5 8.4 9.2 22.4

“n’t” endings 15
numbers 3.4 25.10
pronunciation of 3.7

O

occupations ( jobs) 9 10 16 17 18 22 26
“on” 10.8 14.2
open questions 19
opinions (adjectives) 35
orders 23
“outside” 10.6

P

pastimes 38 39 40
personal information 1 3 10
pets 4.6 5 6
places 25 26 see also town
workplaces 10.4 16
“play” 37.7
plurals 8.1 21.1 22.4
articles 10.1
nouns 6.5 8.4 9.2 15.3 22.4
positive sentences see also “yes” answers
adjectives 35.1
conjunctions 24.7
possessions 7 8 28
possessive adjectives 5
possessive apostrophes 6
possessive pronouns 8
preferences 42
prepositions 14.2 23.6
present simple 13 14.8 16
pronouns 3.3 8.7 25.4
possessive pronouns 8
pronunciation
alphabet 1.8
intonation 17.6
numbers 3.7
‘s’ and ‘es’ endings 13.8
UK and US English differences 14.2 28.9 29.9
46.1

Q

quantities 31.10 32.1
quantity phrases 25.10
questions, answering 18
short answers 18.1 22.12 29.6 29.9 44.7
47.10
questions, asking 17 19 19.4 39.6
“can” questions 44.7
“do” and “does” questions 40.12 47.10
“have” questions 29.1 29.9
“how many” and “how much” questions 31.10
32.1
intonation 17.6

questions, asking continued
“is there” and “are there” questions 31.4
“why questions 40.13
“would” questions 47.10
“quietly” 45.1
“quite” 46 48.2

R

“really” 46 48.2
reason statements 26 40.11 40.13
regular adverbs 45.4
“right” 23.4
rooms 27
routines, daily 12 13 14 see also jobs

S

“s” endings 8.4 9.2 13
saying English see spoken English
scenery 25.7
shopping 33 34 35
verbs 34.1
short answers to questions 18.1 22.12 29.6
29.9 40.12 44.7 47.10
see also “no” answers; “yes” answers
short forms see contractions
simple questions
answering 18
asking 17
short answers 18.1 22.12 29.6 29.9 40.12
44.7 47.10
singular 5.1 28.1
nouns 5.1 6.1 21.1 22.4 25.1
sizing (clothes) 33
skills (abilities) 43 44 46
“some” 22.4 25.10 31.1
spelling
gerunds 37.5
names 1.7
plurals 8.4
UK and US English differences 4.1 4.5 10.4
33.3 48.1 48.4
spoken English 8 15 16 46 see also questions,
asking; questions answering
pronunciation 1.8 3.7 13.8 see also
intonation
saying what the time is 11
saying where you’re from 3.9 3.11
saying your age 3.1
saying your name 1
stress 3.7
UK and US English differences 14.2 28.9 29.9
46.1
sports 14.4 36 37 40
“straight ahead” 23.4
stress (spoken English) 3.7
studying 48
surnames 1.7

183

T

talents 44 see also abilities
tenses present simple 13 14.8 16
“that” and “this” 5.6 8.1
“the” 22.1 48.7 see also “a” and “an”
“there” 24.1 31.4
“there is” and “there are” 21.1
“there isn’t and “there aren’t” 21.6
“these” and “those” 8.1
“this” and “that” 5.6 8.1
time 11 12.2 39.6
time phrases 14 39.2
“to” 14.2
to be 1 3 10.1 19.1 25.4
negatives 15
questions 17.1 17.3 18.1 19.1 19.8
to go 37.1
to have 28 29
to play 37.7
to work 10
“too” 34.6
“too much” and “too many” 32
town 20 21 22 24 25
“type of ” (with favorite) 42.1

UV

UK and US English differences
pronunciation 14.2 28.9 29.9 46.1
spelling 4.1 4.5 10.4 33.3 48.1 48.4
vocabulary 7.1 12.1 20 27 30 33.1 36
uncountable nouns 31 32.4

V

venues sports 36.3
verbs 42.1 44
base form 13.1
gerunds 37

verbs continued
imperatives 23.1
present simple 13.1 13.3 16.3
questions with “do” and “does” 17.8 19.8
with “can” “cannot” and “can’t” 44
endings 13.7 37
modal 47
to be 1 3 10.1 19.1 25.4
negatives 15
questions 17.1 17.3 18.1 19.1 19.8
to go 37.1
to have 28 29
to play 37.7
to work 10
“very” 46

YZ

“y” endings 45.4
years (age) 3
“yes” answers 17
intonation 17.6
short answers 18.1 22.12 29.6 29.9 40.12
44.7 47.10
zero article 48.7

W

“want” 47 48
warnings 23
week 14 14.1
“well” 45.7
“what” 19
“when” 19 39.6
“where” 3.9 19
“who” 19
“why” 19 26 40.13
wishes and desires 47 48.2
“with” 10.11
work
jobs 9 10 16 17 18 22 26
workplaces 10.4 16
“would” 47 48
“would not” and “wouldn’t” 47.7
written English 1.7
apostrophes 6.2
comma use 24.5
gerunds 37.6
plurals 8.4
spelling names 1.7
UK and US differences 4.1 4.5 10.4 33.3
48.1 48.4

Acknowledgments
The publisher would like to thank:
Jo Kent, Trish Burrow, and Emma Watkins for
additional text; Thomas Booth, Helen Fanthorpe,
Helen Leech, Carrie Lewis, and Vicky Richards for
editorial assistance; Stephen Bere, Sarah Hilder,
Amy Child, Fiona Macdonald, and Simon Murrell
for additional design work; Simon Mumford for
maps and national flags; Peter Chrisp for fact
checking; Penny Hands, Amanda Learmonth, and
Carrie Lewis for proofreading; Elizabeth Wise for

184

indexing; Tatiana Boyko, Rory Farrell, Clare Joyce,
and Viola Wang for additional illustrations; Liz
Hammond for editing audio scripts and
managing audio recordings; Hannah Bowen and
Scarlett O’Hara for compiling audio scripts;
George Flamouridis for mixing and mastering
audio recordings; Heather Hughes, Tommy
Callan, Tom Morse, Gillian Reid, and Sonia
Charbonnier for creative technical support;
Vishal Bhatia, Kartik Gera, Sachin Gupta, Shipra

Jain, Deepak Mittal, Nehal Verma, Roohi Rais,
Jaileen Kaur, Anita Yadav, Manish Upreti, Nisha
Shaw, Ankita Yadav, and Priyanka Kharbanda for
technical assistance.

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For more information, please visit
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